Reading: Point of View and Line of Argument

FS Level 2AQACity & GuildsEdexcelHighfield QualificationsNCFEOpen Awards

Reading: Point of View and Line of Argument Revision

Point of View and Line of Argument


You will need to know what both point of view and line of argument mean in your exam.

It will also be important to be able to identify them in texts you are seeing for the first time!

Make sure you are happy with the following topics before continuing:

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Point of View


Point of view is the author’s opinion on a particular topic, and which is¬†expressed in their writing.

There are two ways that their point of view can be stated, explicitly or implicitly.

But, what do these terms mean?…

 

Explicitly = when the author directly states their opinion.

Implicitly = when the opinion of the author is not directly stated – implications help to uncover the true meaning.


 

For Example:

 

a) ‘I hate cricket

Here the writer explicitly states how he feels about cricket.

 

b) ‘Cricket can be a slow paced at times

Although the author doesn’t directly state that he doesn’t like cricket, the implicit meaning here is there that cricket is boring.

 


 

FS Level 2AQAEdexcelCity & GuildsNCFEOpen AwardsHighfield Qualifications

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Line of Argument


 

The line of argument of a writer is the reasoning used to support their idea and opinions.

 

For example:

 

If a boy was asking his parents to buy him a new computer…

 

…his line of argument could be that it would help him with his studies and he would be able to stay in touch with his friends.

 


 

It is also common for authors to use facts to help support arguments.

 

For Example:

 

Drink driving is bad because it is against the law

 

In his sentence, the writer states their point of view on drink driving and uses a fact to reinforce the point.

 


 

FS Level 2AQAEdexcelCity & GuildsNCFEOpen AwardsHighfield Qualifications

Additional Resources

PFS

Exam Tips Cheat Sheet

FS Level 2

Reading: Point of View and Line of Argument Worksheet and Example Questions

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Reading: Point of View and Line of Argument L2

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